8 responses

Dave Mason Mar 05 '13 at 08:50 PM
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Too late to stop the first part of the process. Invitations have been sent to everyone in your gmail address book and all you can now do is damage control.

Click Inbox then Sent then Sent Invitations to bring up your list of outstanding invites. You will have to click each open, one at a time and click the Withdraw button within the invite. If the invite has been accepted or ignored, there won't be a Withdraw button so move on.

Your only other option is to write to Customer Service and ask them to delete all of your outstanding invites. keep in mind this could take them more than one week to accomplish. You have to decide if you can wait that long.

Once the initial invite has been sent, the system will send two reminders space approx 1 week apart.
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    Charles Caro Mar 05 '13 at 08:56 PM
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    At some point in the recent past you opened your email address book to LinkedIn for the purpose of sending out invitations and you clicked to proceed with the operation before you fully read and understood what was about to happen.

    In opening your email address book to LinkedIn without fully reading the instructions you explicitly allowed LinkedIn to send an invitation to *every* email address stored in your email address book.

    LinkedIn not only sent an invitation to each of the email addresses in your email address book but also LinkedIn will send out two (2) invitation reminders to each email address in your email address book.

    The *only* way you can stop the invitation reminders from going out is by going to your LinkedIn "Inbox/Invitations/Sent" folder where you must open each pending invitation and click on the "Withdraw" option. This must be done for each pending invitation on a one-by-one basis.

    There two (2) very important reasons why you should start the process now as follows:

    1. LinkedIn affords each LinkedIn member with only 3,000 invitations, which are supposed to last the member a lifetime. The "Withdraw" process will stop the automatic reminders from going out to recipients, which should relieve some of the embarrassment associated with sending out the invitations.

    2. The recipients of those errant invitations have the opportunity to click on either the "I Don't Know" or spam option when the invitation lands in their inbox. Getting just five (5) "I Don't Know" or spam responses will put your account on restriction, which means you will not be able to send out any invitation without entering the email address of the recipient. You can, of course, appeal to have the restriction lifted by sending a sincere message to LinkedIn Customer Service explaining that you did not know what you were doing and that you will *never* again send out an invitation to someone you don't know.

    By the way, even when you use the "withdraw" feature the invitation is *not* recovered for future use. It is gone forever.

    Also, Dave is absolutely right in saying you would be better off going to the trouble to "withdraw" the invitations yourself rather than let LinkedIn Customer Service do it for you because they won't get to the task for a week to ten (10) days, which is plenty of time for even more people to respond by clicking on the "I Don't Know" link or otherwise causing you embarrassment and/or aggregation.

    The real problem with the "open your email address book" feature is works the exact opposite of how people expect it to work and LinkedIn gives the member no opportunity to see what is about to happen.
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      Jenet Morrow Oct 04 '13 at 05:05 PM
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      You can't. The minute you create an account, you "grant" permission for LinkedIn to access your data. It is not a matter of importaing contacts. It happens when you give them your email address to create an account.
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        Charles Caro Oct 04 '13 at 09:55 PM
        @Jenet - What you are stating is simply *not* true, and it never was true for LinkedIn.

        The *only* way LinkedIn gets access to any member's email account is when the member provides their email password to LinkedIn, and LinkedIn will *never* ask for a member's email password except for the purpose of sending out invitations, and even then there is absolutely no requirement for the member to provide their email password.
        Adrian Jones Jan 14 at 12:50 AM
        I disagree Charles. I have NEVER given LinkedIn permission to access my Gmail contacts. Any yet everytime I open LinkedIn I see "Suggestions" which could ONLY have come from my Gmail contact list. This is an appalling betrayal of trust and I am sure illegal. If anyone is considering class action against LinkedIn, put me down for it.
        Frederic ROCHA Mar 11 at 02:37 PM
        Adrian, I totally agree.
        Some suggestion made by linked in are only possible if they recently accessed my email account.
        The origin of the problem is that in the past I may have given access to my gmail account by misunderstanding and now I don't know how to break this link. Is there a way ?
        Adrian Jones Mar 13 at 01:46 AM
        Hi Frederic,
        There is absolutely nothing a user can do to remove data from LinkedIn's "shadow" database of your contacts, where they store the data stolen from your gmail account. You have to contact customer service and insist they do this for you. Needless to say, before doing so you must delete any LinkedIn app on any device your own - that's how they are stealing your data.

        They will claim you imported your contacts - this is a LIE. They are systematically hacking user's private data for their own purposes, in the most disgusting and underhand manner possible. They don't even have the decency to own up to what they are doing.

        If it weren't for the requirement for me to manage several LinkedIn groups, I would certainly have deleted my account already.
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        David D. Murray Oct 07 '13 at 05:12 PM
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        LinkedIn is quick to get you hooked into doing something, but it is very difficult to delete or undo. LinkedIn's marketing techniques are getting more and more aggressive every day and their site is slowing down. Frankly, I am thinking about simply deleting my account. Over the past four years, it has not provided me one thin dime in my pocket. Having said that, I have made some pretty good friends in a Group. That's the only reason I stay.
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          Agatha C Melvin Oct 08 '13 at 05:42 PM
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          Actually, I've noticed that since I signed into LinkedIn on my Android device that it does not give one the option to block LinkedIn from trolling through your contacts at will. Revoking permission from accessing my gmail account doesn't work, since this isn't where the problem lies, but with the settings within the LinkedIn Android app, which offers little or no options thereby forcing you to accept sync all. Has anyone figured out how to revoke access on the LinkedIn Android app? The fault also lies with LinkedIn since they designed the app with this particular flaw. Thanks in advance.
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            Drick Ward Nov 19 '13 at 01:48 AM
            Great troubleshooting, Agatha. Now we know what hole the data got out through, just need the answer on how to plug that hole.
            Adrian Jones Jan 14 at 12:52 AM
            I think you're right Agatha - I have deleted the LinkedIn app on my Android device. I hope that will fix the problem
            Adrian Jones Mar 13 at 01:52 AM
            Update on this problem. After deleting the Android app, you must contact customer service and insist they delete the data they are holding. There is no way you can do this yourself. If you don't, you will continue to see your private contacts in the People You Might Know feature.

            @Agatha refers to this problem as a "flaw" when in fact it has become abundantly clear in my dealings with LinkedIn that they have designed this behaviour into their apps for the express purpose of stealing your contact data (and anything else they fancy, apparently) in order to "improve your experience" - which of course is BS.
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            Agatha C Melvin Nov 19 '13 at 02:47 AM
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            Thanks for acknowleging Drick. Unfortunately, the onus is on LinkedIn to fess up and fix it, but I skeptical given that companies like FB and Google only pay lip service to privacy and permissions. So why should LinkedIn be any better? Who knows, it may yet happen!
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              Darrin Myrick Nov 25 '13 at 07:56 AM
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              Go to https://www.linkedin.com/contacts/manage_sources/ and Remove your smartphone contacts that were downloaded to Linkedin via the Linkedin Contacts+ or CardMunch apps.
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                Ben McCall Mar 05 at 01:04 AM
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                Thanks Agatha, just deleted the linked in Android app
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