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Charles Caro Aug 14 '13 at 10:28 PM
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You have an active LinkedIn account because you were able to post your question to the LinkedIn Help Forum.

Any invitations you are receiving are coming to you because another member sent you the invitation. LinkedIn will *never* send out an invitation unless the member explicitly clicks to send the invitation(s).

If you want to send a message to LinkedIn Customer Service, you can use the "Contact Us" link appearing at the top of every LinkedIn Help Forum webpage.
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    Kim Reeves Aug 18 '13 at 06:20 PM
    This is not true. LinkedIn has sent out invitations from me which I did not want.
    Charles Caro Aug 18 '13 at 09:22 PM
    @Kim - If you have any doubt regarding whether or not the invitations came from your account take a look at your "pending" invitations. Click on the "Inbox" link at the top of your LinkedIn homepage. Then click the "Invitations" tab and finally the "Sent" link appearing to the left side of the screen. You will see a list of all of the invitations sent through your account. If you don't see an "Accepted" associated with the message, it is a "pending" invitation, which you can open and use the "withdraw" feature. The only way an invitation gets into the "Inbox/Invitations/Sent" folder is when the member authorizes the invitation to be sent, and that can happen only when the member provides their email password to LinkedIn. LinkedIn has absolutely no way of accessing a member's email address book unless the member gives LinkedIn access. The whole "open your email address book" feature is seriously flawed in its design and implementation, but ultimately once the invitations go out it is the member's problem.

    The *only* way you can stop the invitation reminders from going out is by going to your LinkedIn "Inbox/Invitations/Sent" folder where you must open each pending invitation and click on the "Withdraw" option. This must be done for each pending invitation on a one-by-one basis.

    While it is true LinkedIn Customer Service can do the "withdraw" procedure with fewer keystrokes than a member it is important to remember it now takes LinkedIn Customer Service staffers up to 7-10 days to get to and process any service ticket, and all service tickets are handled on a strict FIFO basis regardless of where the service ticket originates. In the meantime LinkedIn will continue to send out the reminder invitations, and the recipients will have additional opportunity to respond to the invitation(s) by clicking on the "Report Spam" or "I Don't Know" options, which will ultimately lead to your account being restricted.
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    Bernard Gore Aug 15 '13 at 12:40 AM
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    Many of these may just be normal spam -, pretending to be related to LinkedIn because that is a good cover for them.

    And you aren't unsubscribed, because otherwise you couldn't post here - just use the "Contact Us" link at the top of this page.
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      Karen Van Hoy Aug 23 '13 at 09:25 PM
      Thanks Bernard.

      They're not spam - the link takes me directly to the site. Ironically, the day that I posted to the forum I clicked on "Contact Us" which took me to a FAQ list. I went around and around - 15 minutes worth of looking - and finally, figuring that contact info might not be available to me as a non-subscriber, out of frustration I posted to the forum.
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      Ann White Sep 21 '13 at 02:04 PM
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      LinkedIn Sued For 'Hacking' Users' Email Accounts To Spam Friends. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/20/linkedin-sued-hacking-emails-spam_n_3963195.html?ncid=edlinkusaolp00000003
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        Charles Caro Sep 21 '13 at 06:53 PM
        @Ann - What those complaining always conveniently forget to mention is they explicitly gave their email address password to LinkedIn knowing they were about to send invitations to people listed in their email address book. The suit is completely baseless because LinkedIn cannot be held responsible when its members fail to actually read and understand what they are doing before clicking to proceed. Even though the feature is very poorly designed and implemented the LinkedIn always has the option to not open their email address book, which would always be the "common sense" thing to do on the Internet.
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        Ben Price Oct 25 '13 at 01:51 PM
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        I've had little luck working with Linkedin to resolve issues. Someone created an account for my brother, who is scientifically but not technically active, which is to say he did not create the Linkedin account. I tried to get this resolved with Linkedin by posting to the Contact Us with no response. I was also unable to telephone Linkedin to discuss the issue. I, just today, received another "invitation" from someone who I know did not create the Linkedin account. My belief is that Linkedin is generating both accounts and invitations.
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          Charles Caro Oct 25 '13 at 09:25 PM
          @Ben - Whomever created the account for your brother violated the LinkedIn User Agreement (Section 2.4.), and your brother should either close the account or reset the password to prevent access by others.

          LinkedIn absolutely does not create accounts, and LinkedIn absolutely does not generate the invitations without the explicit authorization of the LinkedIn member.
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