42 responses

Mike Reno Mar 01 '13 at 02:35 PM
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I just had this same thing happen to me. A few invites were supposedly sent to people I do not know. They are certainly NOT in my address book. They perhaps tangentially related to my industry. Embarrassing.
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    Dave Mason Feb 19 '13 at 12:00 PM
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    There is no way that LinkedIn needs your email list so bad that they are going to "hack" your list and risk the lawsuits.

    You gave the permission. Why you set up your account using the same password on both your LI account and your email account is puzzling. If you had simply used a different password, even if you mistakenly thought you were signing in by having a different password, the system would not have been able to complete the import.

    There is only ONE reason LI ever ask for your email address and email password and if you can't tell the difference between a sign in screen a d the permission screen the. By changing your password to be different, you can protect yourself.
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      Charles Caro Feb 19 '13 at 07:27 PM
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      At some point in the recent past you opened your email address book to LinkedIn for the purpose of sending out invitations and you clicked to proceed with the operation before you fully read and understood what was about to happen.

      In opening your email address book to LinkedIn without fully reading the instructions you explicitly allowed LinkedIn to send an invitation to *every* email address stored in your email address book.

      LinkedIn not only sent an invitation to each of the email addresses in your email address book but also LinkedIn will send out two (2) invitation reminders to each email address in your email address book.

      The *only* way you can stop the invitation reminders from going out is by going to your LinkedIn "Inbox/Invitations/Sent" folder where you must open each pending invitation and click on the "Withdraw" option. This must be done for each pending invitation on a one-by-one basis.

      There two (2) very important reasons why you should start the process now as follows:

      1. LinkedIn affords each LinkedIn member with only 3,000 invitations, which are supposed to last the member a lifetime. The "Withdraw" process will stop the automatic reminders from going out to recipients, which should relieve some of the embarrassment associated with sending out the invitations.

      2. The recipients of those errant invitations have the opportunity to click on either the "I Don't Know" or spam option when the invitation lands in their inbox. Getting just five (5) "I Don't Know" or spam responses will put your account on restriction, which means you will not be able to send out any invitation without entering the email address of the recipient. You can, of course, appeal to have the restriction lifted by sending a sincere message to LinkedIn Customer Service explaining that you did not know what you were doing and that you will *never* again send out an invitation to someone you don't know.
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        Ryan Hagy Mar 08 '13 at 04:18 PM
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        This just happened to me. Absolutely terrible practice. Its a confusing and disrespectful thing to do to linkedin users. This is embarrassing as I do not even know half of the people who are getting invites from me.
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          Tim Shih Feb 22 '13 at 01:02 AM
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          Here's a doozy for you LinkedIn fanboys, same thing just happened to me, except I certainly never gave permission and the invite went out at 3:28 AM, while I was still asleep. Now, I suppose I could have sleep-invited all of my gmail contacts, but I generally follow the principle formalized in Occam's Razor, that the simplest solution (or the one taking into account the fewest assumptions) should be regarded as correct. Either one of you could have done a quick google search and discovered that this is a problem stretching back to several years and that a number of these complaints on this very website were subsequently deleted by LinkedIn. Either way, I express my support for the original poster and highly sympathize with her situation.
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            Christine Serrano Glassner Feb 23 '13 at 05:33 PM
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            I concur with Tim and support some version of the first posters claim. Although for the last few months I have minimized my use of LinkedIn, the level of spam like activity has significantly increased. I have not sent out any invites, however I am receiving numerous acceptances of my invites weekly from people I do not know at all and have nothing in common with. I used to view LinkedIn as an internet-safe places for professionals, now it feels like it is heading into the e-vunerable world of the likes of facebook.
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              Ben Kirwood Mar 01 '13 at 11:53 PM
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              LinkedIn is not just accessing my address book, it is accessing the history of everyone I have ever sent emails to. I have about 50 people in my address book (who I also did not want invitations sent to) and I have 280 pending invitations to withdraw. I am seriously considering closing my account, great way to ruin a good service LinkedIn!!!
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                Jennifer Hughes Mar 05 '13 at 11:42 AM
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                My group emails at work (which I have never associated with my LinkedIn account as my LI is linked to my gmail address) have been sent requests with my information inviting then to connect. It is making up names, and looks like a LinkedIn email, apart from Outlook automatically filters it as spam. Is there any way to stop this from happening? I don't believe this to be a LinkedIn issue directly, but seems more like spam from hackers and bots. Gmail and Hotmail both have detection systems in place for this type of activity to stop it from happening.
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                  CYNTHIA HUBBARD Mar 06 '13 at 08:40 PM
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                  Here's a recent email I sent to LinkedIn. I still have not received a response.
                  Dear Sir/Madam:
                  As part of your services promised you state: "We will not email anyone without your permission," yet that is exactly what your company has done repeatedly & precisely in my case. A few examples: (1) a former quite disturbing female coworker, with whom I had a great deal of trouble was emailed an invite to join Linked at my alleged behest to join though I did not choose to have any dealings with her or wish to speak her with under any circumstances; (2) re: a lawsuit I had been involved in, email invites were sent to five (5) different individuals from opposing in- house counsel and corporate defendants, which would have been extremely awkward had the case still been actively in litigation and not settled; (3) you emailed a personal acquantance who I had no intention of adding to my contact list; (4) you emailed an invite to join LinkedIn, as if I had personally sent it myself, to a workers compensation client I referred out to another law firm, a person I would never personally invite to my contact list, which is incredibly inappropriate!! I do not under any circumstances want invitations being sent out without my knowledge or permission!! I do not appreciate having my personal information, email information, or email list being used or desemininated without my knowledge, instruction, or permission!
                  Cynthia H. J.D., LL.M.
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                    Jeremy Simpson Mar 08 '13 at 05:47 PM
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                    Likewise. I just got an invitation sent to my work email address from my work business page. I manage that page. Why would I ever send an invitation to connect with myself? The same thing happened on a business page with Facebook a few years ago. It's definitely some shady stuff.
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